Developmental Report for
Suzanne Example

(4/5/2002)

 

Introduction   |    Dimensions   |    Reading the Graphic Profile
Graphic Profile   |    Reading the Detail   |    Detail of Responses
Areas of Strength   |    Developmental Needs   |    Action Planning

     

 

 

Introduction
 

What is the Assess360 Survey?

It is a system for gathering anonymous, constructive feedback from others about how they perceive you at work. Typically, this information comes from many people who interact with you in different ways: your boss, peers, direct reports and others.

 

Who is it for?

This Survey can be used for anyone at work but is best suited to professionals, supervisors and managers, or others who have significant work responsibilities that require them to interact effectively with people at work.

 

What does it measure?

This Survey measures how others perceive or interpret your personality at work. That is, in contrast to the type of measurement made by the ASSESS personality assessment, respondents to your Assess360 are commenting on the behaviors they perceive as manifestations of your personality.

 

How should it be used?

This Survey should be used to provide constructive feedback for your personal development and growth at work. It is not appropriate for employment selection or placement decisions or for performance appraisal.

It is best used as part of a one-on-one coaching program or as a component in small-group seminars focused on personal development and growth at work. In both cases, best results will be obtained when the effort includes goal setting and a written developmental action plan.

 

How can these results be combined with my ASSESS Developmental Report?

Assess360 was designed to complement the ASSESS personality assessment. Both cover the same or very similar dimensions, but ASSESS was designed to measure and interpret your work-related personality directly, while Assess360 was designed to measure the behavioral manifestations of that personality, as perceived by others who work closely with you. We recommend these two instruments be used together when possible.

 

Dimensions of the Survey
 

Your Assess360 feedback is grouped into three general areas:

 

THINKING:

Reflective
- Looking at situations from a broader perspective; clearly seeing the underlying issues; developing a deeper understanding.

Organized (Thinking)
- Taking a logical, organized and systematic approach to problem solving; being thorough and detailed in evaluating information.

Decisive
- Committing to a course of action and moving forward.

Objective
- Using facts and data in solving problems and making decisions; preventing personal opinions and biases from unduly influencing judgments.

Flexible
- Demonstrating a willingness to consider contrary information or opposing viewpoints and, if appropriate, adapting or changing your opinion or point of view.

Practical/Realistic
- Taking a common sense, pragmatic approach to solving problems; demonstrating good judgment; developing practical solutions.

 

WORKING:

Fast Paced
- Demonstrating a sense of urgency in your work; action-oriented.

Effortful
- Putting forth the effort needed to achieve results; persistent and determined.

Self-Reliant
- Taking responsibility for yourself and your work; showing initiative; working independently.

Responsible/Dependable
- Following through on commitments; meeting deadlines; being someone on whom others can rely to get the work done and to do your fair share.

Accepting of Direction
- Willing to accept guidance, listen to others and follow rules and procedures.

Adaptable
- Adjusting to new circumstances; demonstrating open-mindedness when faced with change; willing to listen and try new methods and ideas.

Organized (Working)
- Taking a disciplined and organized approach in your work; managing time well; focusing on key priorities.

Detail Minded
- Attending to important details; being careful, precise and accurate.

Outcome Oriented
- Having high personal standards; producing high quality work; achieving results.

Self Improving
- Continually learning and improving your skills to enhance job performance; taking ownership of your development.

 

RELATING:

Aggressive
- Persisting in the pursuit of personal goals; bold; competitive.

Assertive
- Willing to convey your ideas and opinions; displaying confidence; persuasive in your dealings with others.

Domineering
- Putting self ahead of others; demanding; pushy and overbearing.

Sociable
- Outgoing, approachable; willing to initiate informal communication; putting others at ease.

Caring
- Caring about others; fostering positive work relationships; warm; friendly.

Cooperative
- Being smooth and cooperative in your dealings with people; collaborative.

Positive About People
- Having an optimistic, positive outlook regarding the intentions of others; looking for the best in others; building relationships based on trust.

Perceptive
- Understanding the needs and motivations of others; perceptive and intuitive; reading people well.

Optimistic
- Demonstrating a positive outlook; being resilient when faced with setbacks and disappointments; resistant to stress.

Composed
- Remaining calm and even-tempered across a variety of situations.

Criticism Tolerant
- Accepting criticism constructively and using negative feedback to improve.

Temperamental
- Behaving in an angry or defensive manner; displaying a temper in some circumstances.

 


Reading the Graphic Profile
 

Your respondents were asked to rate you on a list of adjectives and adjective phrases in two ways. First, they were asked to indicate which adjectives describe you and which do not. Second, for each adjective, they were asked to indicate whether you should be more, be less or stay the same. After the surveys were collected, the Assess360 Survey system combined the results from your respondents to produce your Graphic Profile and the other portions of the following report. Responses for individual adjectives were grouped by respondent type into dimensions and these dimensions were grouped into the three areas of Thinking, Working and Relating.

 

The Plot Symbols:

The average of each respondent group is plotted for each dimension using a different symbol for each group. (See listing on the Profile.) The shapes of the symbols have been chosen to allow them to overlay each other.

 

Description Column:

The Profile is divided into two columns. The first represents how your respondents described you using the adjectives. For each group you may be plotted from 0% to 100% representing the proportion of raters who described you using the adjectives grouped under each dimension. (To read the adjectives used in each dimension, see the Detail of Responses.) For most dimensions, 100% is the best rating. For a few dimensions (for example, Temperamental under Relating), 0% is the best rating.

 

Desired Change Column:

The second column represents the degree and direction of change desired by your respondents. For each respondent group, you may be plotted from -100% (be less) to +100% (be more) for each adjective dimension. 0% (a score in the middle) is the best rating for this column, and scores deviating from the middle in either direction indicate a need for change in varying degrees.

 

How do I determine my strengths and my areas for development?

For most dimensions, strengths will be indicated by a high description score (approaching 100%) and a low desired change score (at or close to 0%). For the few reverse-scored dimensions, strengths will be indicated by a description at or close to 0% and a low desired change score. Areas for development will be primarily indicated by high desired change scores (positive or negative).

Remember to pay attention to the difference in ratings across groups. On a given dimension, for example, your boss may rate you highly while another group rates you less positively. This may indicate an area of developmental need when dealing with a particular group.

 
Graphic Profile
Self boss Peers Direct Reports Others

 

THINKING STYLE

Description

                       
Reflective  
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
     
     
     
Organized (Thinking)  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
 
Decisive  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
  
Objective  
      
      
      
      
    
    
      
     
      
      
      
Flexible  
      
      
    
      
      
      
     
    
      
      
      
Practical/Realistic  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
    
     
  | | | | | | | |
 

Desired Change

                 
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
   
      
      
      
      
      
     
      
     
   
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
      
     
      
     
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
      
     
     
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
    
     
      
      
| | | | | | | |
 

WORKING STYLE

Description

                       
Fast Paced  
      
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
     
Effortful  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
    
     
Self-Reliant  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
 
Responsible/Dependable  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
 
Accepting of Direction  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
      
   
Adaptable  
      
      
    
      
      
      
      
     
   
      
      
Organized (Working)  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
   
     
Detail Minded  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
  
Outcome Oriented  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
  
Self Improving  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
   
   
  | | | | | | | |
 

Desired Change

                 
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
   
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
   
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
   
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
   
   
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
   
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
      
     
     
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
  
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
   
      
     
     
      
| | | | | | | |
 

RELATING STYLE

Description

                       
Aggressive  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
   
Assertive  
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
     
     
     
Domineering  
      
      
     
      
      
   
      
      
      
      
     
Sociable  
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
      
      
     
   
Caring  
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
      
     
     
     
Cooperative  
      
      
      
      
    
      
      
    
     
      
      
Positive About People  
      
    
      
      
      
      
    
      
     
      
      
Perceptive  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
   
Optimistic  
      
      
      
      
    
      
      
      
     
   
      
Composed  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
  
Criticism Tolerant  
      
      
      
      
      
     
      
  
      
      
      
Temperamental  
      
      
     
     
     
    
      
      
      
      
      
  | | | | | | | |
 

Desired Change

                 
      
      
   
      
      
     
      
     
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
    
     
      
      
      
      
     
      
    
     
      
     
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
     
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
   
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
      
     
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
  
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
      
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
  
    
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
     
     
    
     
      
      
      
      
      
    
     
      
   
      
      
      
      
      
| | | | | | | |
 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of respondents included in this report:

Self: [1]
Boss(es): [2]
Peers: [6]
Direct Reports: [0]
Others: [3]

 

Reading the Detail of Responses
 

Use the Detail of Responses to better understand the summary scores provided on the Graphic Profile.

As with the Graphic Profile, the information is provided by dimension within the three broad areas of Thinking, Working and Relating. However, in the Detail, you can see each survey adjective that contributes to the dimension and how each of your respondent groups rated you.

 

Describes Me Column:

This column lists the number of respondents in each group who indicated the adjective or adjective phrase describes you.

 

Be More and Be Less Columns:

These columns list the number of respondents in each group who indicated you should be more or be less of each characteristic. If no numbers are displayed, this means all of your respondents indicated you should stay the same (not change).

 

How Should I Use This Information?

In any group of people there is a good chance that one person will perceive you oddly. Try to focus on the things said by many of your respondents and pay less attention to those things highlighted by only one respondent.

 

 

 

Detail of Responses for Suzanne Example

Thinking
Working
Relating

 
 
THINKING
       
Reflective   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Anticipates problems Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Insightful about issues/problems Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Looks at issues from broad perspective Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 4 2 1
Direct Report
Other 1 3
  Looks below surface to see real problems Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 1 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Shallow, short-sighted Self
Boss 1
Peer 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
Organized (Thinking)   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Detail-oriented Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 2 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1 1
  Logical Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Organized in dealing with information Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 2
Direct Report
Other 3
  Thorough Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 3
Direct Report
Other 3 1 1
Decisive   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Decisive Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 2
Direct Report
Other 3
  Indecisive Self
Boss
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other 1
Objective   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Emotions, opinions color judgment Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 4 1 3
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Factual Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Objective, unbiased Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 4 2 1
Direct Report
Other 2 3
  Subjective, biased Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 4 3
Direct Report
Other 2 1 1
Flexible   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Adaptable Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Flexible Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 3 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Open-minded Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 2 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Opinionated Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 4 1 3
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Stubborn Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 4 1 3
Direct Report
Other 1 2
Practical/Realistic   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Good common sense Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Good judgment Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Idealistic Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 1 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Impractical Self
Boss
Peer
Direct Report
Other 1
  Practical Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 2
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Realistic Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
 
WORKING
       
Fast Paced   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Action-oriented Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 4 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Energetic Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 4 3 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Works quickly Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 3
Direct Report
Other 2 2
  Works slowly Self
Boss 2 2
Peer 2
Direct Report
Other 1 2
Effortful   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Determined Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Hard worker Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 5 4
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Lazy Self
Boss 1 2
Peer 2
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Needs prodding Self
Boss 1 2
Peer 2 2 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1 2
  Persistent Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 4 1 1
Direct Report
Other 3
  Results-oriented Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 2 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
Self-Reliant   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Accepts responsibility Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 3
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Needs help often Self
Boss
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other
  Self-starter Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 3 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Takes initiative Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 2 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Works independently Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
Responsible/Dependable   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Dependable Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Fails to meet deadlines Self
Boss 1
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Good follow-through Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Irresponsible Self
Boss
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other
  Keeps commitments Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3
  Responsible Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Serious-minded Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Unreliable Self
Boss
Peer
Direct Report
Other
Accepting of Direction   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Accepts direction Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 3
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Resists direction Self 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 2 1
Direct Report
Other 1
  Will not follow rules Self
Boss 1
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other
Adaptable   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Adaptable Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 3
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Open to change Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 4 3 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Resists change Self
Boss 2 2
Peer 1 1 1
Direct Report
Other 2 1 2
  Stubborn, hard-headed Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 4 1 3
Direct Report
Other 1 1 1
Organized (Working)   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Disorganized Self
Boss
Peer
Direct Report
Other 1
  Manages time well Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 4 4 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Prioritizes work Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 2
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Well organized Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3
  Works on high priorities first Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 4 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1
Detail Minded   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Accurate Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3
  Careful Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Careless Self
Boss
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other
  Detail-oriented Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1
Outcome Oriented   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Achieves results Self 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3
  Produces high quality work Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1 1
  Productive Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 4 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Shows high personal standards Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3
Self Improving   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Develops new skills Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 3
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Keeps skills up to date Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Takes initiative for self development Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 1 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Willing to learn Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
 
RELATING
       
Aggressive   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Aggressive Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 6 1 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Competitive Self 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5
Direct Report
Other 3
Assertive   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Assertive Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Forceful Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 3 2
Direct Report
Other 2
  Passive Self
Boss 1 1 1
Peer
Direct Report
Other
  Persuasive Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 6 1 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1
Domineering   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Demanding Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 4 3
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Dominating Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 3 3
Direct Report
Other 1
  Pushy Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 2 1 2
Direct Report
Other 1
Sociable   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Approachable Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 6 2
Direct Report
Other 3
  At ease with people Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Distant from others Self
Boss 2 2
Peer
Direct Report
Other 1
  Meets new people easily Self 1 1
Boss 2 1
Peer 5
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Outgoing Self 1 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 5
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Reserved Self 1
Boss 1 1 1
Peer 2 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1
  Shy Self
Boss
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other
Caring   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Cares about others Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 3
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Cold Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Considerate Self 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 4
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Friendly Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Impersonal Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 2 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1
  Insensitive Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 1 2 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Warm Self
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 2
Direct Report
Other 3 2
Cooperative   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Abrasive Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 2 1
Direct Report
Other 1 2
  Argumentative Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 1 3
Direct Report
Other 1 2
  Blunt Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 4 1 3
Direct Report
Other 2 2
  Cooperative Self 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 6 3
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Fair Self 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 2 1
Direct Report
Other 3
  Forgiving Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 2 1
Direct Report
Other 2 1
  Mean Self
Boss
Peer
Direct Report
Other
Positive About People   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Critical of others Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 4 3
Direct Report
Other 2 1 2
  Intolerant of others Self
Boss 2 2
Peer 3 2 2
Direct Report
Other 3 1 1
  Looks for the best in people Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 3 3 1
Direct Report
Other 3 3
  Suspicious Self 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 1 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Tolerant of others Self 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 4 3 1
Direct Report
Other 2 3
  Trusting Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 4 2 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
Perceptive   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Lacks insight about people Self
Boss
Peer 1 1
Direct Report
Other
  Perceptive about people Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3 2 1
  Understands the needs & desires of others Self 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 4 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
Optimistic   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Easily discouraged Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other 1
  Moody Self 1 1
Boss 2 2
Peer 3 1 2
Direct Report
Other 1 1 2
  Optimistic Self 1 1
Boss 2
Peer 5 2 1
Direct Report
Other 3
  Pessimistic Self
Boss 2 2
Peer 2 1 1
Direct Report
Other
  Positive attitude Self 1 1
Boss 1 2
Peer 5 3 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Recovers quickly from setbacks Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 1
Direct Report
Other 3 2
  Sensitive to stress Self
Boss
Peer 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
Composed   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Calm Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 6 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Composed Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6
Direct Report
Other 3
  Even-tempered Self 1
Boss 2
Peer 6 1 1
Direct Report
Other 3 1
  Over reacts Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1
  Tense Self
Boss
Peer
Direct Report
Other
Criticism Tolerant   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Accepts criticism well Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 2 3 2
Direct Report
Other 2 3
  Sensitive to criticism Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 3 4
Direct Report
Other 2 2
  Thin-skinned Self 1
Boss 1
Peer 2 2
Direct Report
Other 2
Temperamental   Describes Me Be More Be Less
  Angry Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 1
Direct Report
Other
  Defensive Self
Boss 1 1
Peer 5 4
Direct Report
Other 1 1
  Has a temper Self 1
Boss 1 1
Peer 3 1 1
Direct Report
Other 1 1
 

 

Areas of Strength
 

You will want to review the Graphic Profile and the Detail of Responses to form your own opinions about what areas of strength you want to emphasize in the future and what areas you want to develop or improve. To assist you in this process, the Assess360 system has used an internal scoring scheme to indicate highest rated strengths and developmental needs from your results.

Remember, development is more than improving areas of weakness. Sometimes the most important improvement you can make is to emphasize or build upon a strength you already have.

Below are the highest rated strengths indicated by each of your respondent groups. Following on the next pages are suggestions for emphasizing your strengths in your developmental plan.

 

Boss ratings:

    Responsible/Dependable
    Detail Minded
    Organized (Thinking)
 

Peer ratings:

    Aggressive
    Responsible/Dependable
    Composed
 

Other ratings:

    Composed
    Organized (Thinking)
    Responsible/Dependable
 



Using Your Strengths
 

 

Based on the strengths that were highlighted, we recommend you consider the following suggestions to better use or accentuate your strengths. Include these in your developmental action plan.

THINKING - Organized (Thinking)

  • Look for roles and responsibilities that emphasize planning and organizing projects and activities.

  • Help tackle complex problems where a thorough, logical approach will be needed to break the problem down into smaller, more manageable pieces.

  • Serve as a coach/mentor for others who are trying to develop more systematic or organized thinking styles.

  • Help organize information in your work group so that people can find resources quickly.

WORKING - Responsible/Dependable
  • Look for opportunities to assume more responsibility.

  • Offer to champion an important initiative.

  • Encourage others to be accountable and meet deadlines; emphasize the importance of being a responsible person on whom others can count; be a role model.

WORKING - Detail Minded
  • Use your strengths in this area to help others improve the quality of their work. When the cost of a mistake is high, try to review the work to make sure it is perfect.

  • Work on projects that require a strong detail orientation. For example, volunteer for a committee that is organizing marketing materials or a website for the company. Use your strengths in this area to proofread the work before it is made public.

RELATING - Aggressive
  • Use your competitive nature to encourage positive competition in your work group.

  • Look for ways to improve the business or increase sales.

  • Seek out roles that require taking a difficult position and being forceful in order to get things done.

  • Help others who may have a tendency to be too agreeable by encouraging them to speak up and be more aggressive in reaching their goals.

  • In situations that are ambiguous or have short time frames, use your competitive nature to make sure that things get done.

RELATING - Composed
  • Seek out roles and responsibilities in which your ability to remain calm will be an asset.

  • Set a good example for others with your composed demeanor; let them lean on you during times of adversity.

  • If you notice a setback on a project negatively affecting other team members or your direct reports, discuss their concerns and discuss your perception of the situation.

 

Suggested Developmental Needs
 

You will want to review the Graphic profile and the Detail of Responses to form your own opinions about what areas of strength you want to emphasize in the future and what areas you want to develop or improve. To assist you in this process, the Assess360 system has used an internal scoring scheme to indicate highest rated strengths and developmental needs from your results. Following are the highest rated developmental needs indicated by each of your respondent groups.

 

Boss ratings:

    Be More Flexible
    Be More Adaptable
    Be More Positive About People
 

Peer ratings:

    Be More Fast Paced
    Be Less Domineering
    Be More Criticism Tolerant
 

Other ratings:

    Be More Flexible
    Be More Fast Paced
    Be More Reflective
 



Reading the Developmental Suggestions
 

Based on the Developmental Needs highlighted, the following developmental suggestions have been generated to assist you in writing a developmental action plan.

As you read these suggestions and consider writing your developmental action plan, keep the following in mind:

  • Some feedback, and the suggestions generated on the basis of this feedback, is more important than others.

  • Think about from where the feedback came and how well qualified this group is to comment on the specific dimension. How often do they have the opportunity to observe your behavior on this dimension relative to other groups? How well do they understand the issues involved? Etc.

    In some cases, your boss might have had the best opportunity to observe and comment on your decision making style, for example, while other respondents, peers, for example, may not have had as much experience with you in this area. In other cases, your direct reports might have a much better knowledge of your ability to persuade, for example, than your boss.

  • Think about what areas could have the most impact on what you want to accomplish in your current job or in a future job of increased responsibility.

  • Pick 2-4 areas to include in your developmental plan for now. Focus your energies on a few things at first and add to your list later.

  • Before you finalize your plan, be sure to gather more information from your respondents. While this report provides some speculation about possible reasons for your results, it is important to seek further input, specific examples, etc. so that your goals and action plans are on target.


Be More: Reflective
 

Definition: Looking at situations from a broader perspective; clearly seeing the underlying issues; developing a deeper understanding.

Need to be more:

If your results indicate that others think you should be more perceptive and reflective in your thinking, here are some possible reasons:

  • You may tend to take information at surface value rather than looking deeper.

  • You may need to be more thorough in your analysis of people and problems.

  • You may not always anticipate problems or the reactions of others.

  • You may prefer to use a "quick fix" approach to problem solving.

  • You may sometimes forget to consider how your decisions and actions may impact others.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Identify someone with whom you work who is respected for insight and perceptiveness in their approach to issues/problems. Use this person as a role model and perhaps even as a sounding board. For example, after you both attend a meeting, you might share your impressions of the meeting. Was your understanding similar or different from theirs? Did you miss something important?

  • Establish relationships with people in other areas of your company. Share ideas, goals and problems. This will help you anticipate how your actions may impact someone else.

  • Try to put yourself in the other person's place and look at an issue from their point of view.

  • Keep a pencil and a pad of paper handy so that you can jot down thoughts about a problem or situation as the ideas come to you while sleeping, exercising, commuting to work, or relaxing.

  • Get in the habit of asking yourself, "Are there any other aspects of this issue that I may have missed?"

  • Never accept the first solution that comes to your mind; always think about what other alternatives there might be.

  • Before making a decision or taking action, list all possible options and the possible consequences (positive and negative) of each decision. Consult with someone who will be affected by the decision. Did you miss anything?

  • For important decisions, list each person who will be affected by the decision and how it will affect that person.

  • Ask yourself what problems might arise, and develop contingency plans for each one.

  • To increase your awareness of the less obvious details, keep a daily journal to record some of the seemingly unimportant events of your day.

  • When something happens that you did not anticipate, evaluate the preceding events. Could you have anticipated it? Was there something you could have done differently? Use what you learn in the future.

 

Suggested Resources:



Be More: Flexible
 

Definition: Demonstrating a willingness to consider contrary information or opposing viewpoints and, if appropriate, adapting or changing your opinion or point of view.

Need to be more:

If your results indicate that others think you should be more flexible and adaptable in your thinking, here are some possible reasons:

  • Once you have made up your mind about something you may tend to discount or disregard contrary information.

  • You may defend your beliefs so strongly that you are perceived by others as being overly opinionated or judgmental.

  • You may feel that the ways you do things are the only correct ways to do them.

  • You may have been overly vocal about your disapproval of others' choices or decisions.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Ask a trusted coworker or boss to help you identify any patterns of stubborn or intolerant behavior of which you may not be aware.

  • Put yourself in the other person's place. Listen to their point of view before defending your own.

  • Identify different perspectives and consider alternative ways to approach a problem by asking coworkers for their opinions on the pros and cons of an issue.

  • Be open to considering new ways of doing things. Be aware of times when you cling to a solution or procedure because "that is the way it has always been done."

  • Try to avoid saying, "It can not be done," and look for ways you can make it happen.

  • Simply state your point of view; resist the urge to lecture about why you are right.

  • Be willing to change your mind when new information becomes available. If you cannot reach an agreement, agree to disagree.

 

Suggested Resources:



Be More: Fast Paced
 

Definition: Demonstrating a sense of urgency in your work; action-oriented.

Need to be more:

Others perceive you as working more slowly or deliberately than most and suggest that your effectiveness might improve if you worked at a faster pace. Here are some possible reasons why you might receive this type of feedback:

  • You may be too methodical or detailed with your work at the expense of timeliness.

  • You may tend to put off or procrastinate on less interesting tasks.

  • You may be working hard, but not producing as much as others because you are less efficient in your work approach.

  • Perhaps others expect more of you than you realize.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Identify someone with whom you work who has a high energy level and gets results. Watch this person's behavior to see if you can learn anything.

  • When you accept a new task or responsibility make a greater effort to determine the sense of urgency around the activity. Make a commitment to working quickly when there is a need.

  • "Go the extra mile." Perhaps you could plan to stay late (or come in early) one day a week to get important assignments finished.

  • Evaluate your lifestyle to determine whether you are getting adequate rest, nutrition, and exercise to operate effectively on the job.

  • If you are working hard and achieving satisfactory results, some "impression management" may be in order: Show enthusiasm, talk with coworkers about the projects you are working on and the results you have achieved.

  • Ask others what they expect. When do they want something accomplished? Plan your time accordingly. Whenever possible, beat the deadline they have set.

  • Use time management techniques to better plan your activities. For example, set interim deadlines on projects to ensure you are progressing at the appropriate speed.

 

Suggested Resources:



Be More: Adaptable
 

Definition: Adjusting to new circumstances; demonstrating open-mindedness when faced with change; willing to listen and try new methods and ideas.

Need to be more:

If the results of your feedback indicate that you should be more adaptable, perhaps these are some of the reasons:

  • You may be stubborn or inflexible about new ideas or procedures.

  • You may become flustered when things do not go the way you expected.

  • Perhaps you are very traditional, and others perceive this as being rigid.

  • You may avoid or ignore new ways to do things and stay with the things that have worked in the past.

  • Your business may be changing rapidly, and your resistance to change may be hurting the group's ability to move forward.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Talk to others more about changes in the business. If you can anticipate possible changes you will have more time to prepare.

  • Be open-minded to new ideas that may be different from the way you are used to doing things. Try to avoid the tendency to look for why it will not work and make a list of why it might work.

  • Do not automatically say "no" to a request; take a minute to consider whether the request is reasonable or if it will impact your work in any significant way.

  • Try to make one improvement or change in your work each month. Evaluate the impact and decide if you want to implement this change permanently.

  • Try not to overreact to disappointments, unexpected occurrences or changes in plans.

  • Seek better ways to do things. Are there things you can change to become more effective? Take a more proactive, rather than reactive, approach.

  • Try to anticipate changes that may occur so that you are more prepared for their impact. Are there changes in the market, industry, organization, or technology that may impact your role?

 

Suggested Resources:



Be Less: Domineering
 

Definition: Putting self ahead of others; demanding; pushy and overbearing.

Need to be less:

If others indicate that you should moderate the level of control you apply to others, here are some possible reasons:

  • They may feel that you place your personal needs ahead of theirs.

  • You may be pushy in your dealings with others.

  • Others may feel that you try to manipulate them into doing what you want them to do.

  • Your strong style may cause you to overshadow others. They may feel that they cannot speak up or share control with you.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Do you find yourself telling people what to do, rather than asking? Make an effort to ask others what they desire from a work relationship.

  • Try to rephrase your sentences to make them sound more like requests rather than demands. For example, instead of "I expect this to be finished and on my desk in 10 minutes" try "This particular project is very urgent. I understand that you are busy, but I would appreciate it if you could get this to me for my review in 10 minutes. Thank you."

  • When you are in a group, be cognizant of how much you talk compared to how much others talk.

  • For just one meeting, try to speak only when spoken to. Listen to what others say.

  • Make an effort to notice how your actions affect others around you. Ask others to give you feedback on how your actions affect them. Remember to let them talk and do not dominate the conversation.

  • Develop your negotiation skills. Work on finding win-win solutions.

  • While all of your projects are personally important to you, try to keep them in perspective with your team's and organization's goals. It may be that someone else's project needs to be in the forefront. Ask your boss for feedback in this area.

 

Suggested Resources:



Be More: Positive About People
 

Definition: Having an optimistic, positive outlook regarding the intentions of others; looking for the best in others; building relationships based on trust.

Need to be more:

If your results indicate that you have a more negative view of others than you should, here are some possible reasons:

  • By your words or actions, you may convey a distrust of people.

  • You may focus on others' liabilities or deficiencies rather than their assets or what they offer.

  • You may not give people the benefit of the doubt as much as they think you should.

  • You may be too critical, perfectionistic or hard to please.

  • You may have a tendency to question others' real intentions or motives or be overly suspicious.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Ask yourself if you maintain a balanced perspective on people -- that is, do you place equal emphasis on their assets and liabilities (their strengths and their weaknesses). Try making a list for each of your coworkers and direct reports to see how balanced you are in your perspective. If the negatives outweigh the positives, make a special effort to learn more about each person and their contributions to your work group.

  • Work on being more tolerant and also more realistic in your expectations of people. Try to judge others as you would like to be judged, and try to give people the benefit of the doubt and not assume their intentions are always suspect.

  • Give others a second chance once in a while.

  • Work at establishing relationships with people who are different from you. Interacting with people of different backgrounds will help you learn about the unique contributions others offer.

  • When you have a critical or distrustful thought about someone, write it down. Then try to write down twice as many positive aspects about the person.

  • Remember that everyone is human and everyone makes mistakes. Allow people to be imperfect once in a while.

  • Talk to others about their expectations and compare them to yours. Discuss them with your coworkers to develop a more balanced perspective.

  • Make an effort to praise others when they have done a good job; they may listen more to your suggestions for improvement if they feel you have a balanced perspective.

 

Suggested Resources:



Be More: Criticism Tolerant
 

Definition: Accepting criticism constructively and using negative feedback to improve.

Need to be more:

If your results indicate that others think you should be more tolerant of criticism, here are some possible reasons:

  • Others may feel that you take criticism too personally and, therefore, may be uncomfortable giving you constructive criticism.

  • In the past, you may have been defensive when you received negative feedback and may not have used it to your advantage.

 

Developmental Suggestions:

  • Ask yourself why your feelings are hurt when someone gives you negative feedback or criticism. Is it because you demand perfection of yourself and overreact to any suggestion that you are less than the best? Keep in mind that everyone has assets and liabilities (strengths and weaknesses). Try to be easier on yourself.

  • The next time you feel someone is being overly critical of you, step back from the situation and try to view it in a more objective manner. Maybe they are just trying to give you information to help you and are not making a statement about your personal value or worth.

  • Remember that all of us need both positive and negative feedback to grow and develop. Try to accept both gracefully. If you respond too defensively, people may stop providing you with this valuable information.

  • When you feel yourself becoming frustrated or defensive, try to remain calm. Take a few deep breaths to relax and loosen the tension; then focus on what is being said.

  • To be more open-minded when receiving feedback:

    1. Recognize that others may not know how to give feedback in the best way, but that does not mean their feedback is not useful to you.
    2. Listen carefully and try not to interrupt them.
    3. Ask specific questions to make sure you understand what they are trying to convey (e.g., "Can you give me an example of what you mean?").
    4. Briefly repeat, in your own words, what you think the person is saying. (e.g.; "You mean I overreacted when you said . . .") They will either agree with your restatement or they will refine their point in a way that will help you understand.
    5. Acknowledge valid points. Think them through and then discuss them calmly and tactfully.

 

Suggested Resources:

 

Using Your Assess360 Results For Development
 

While most people feel they behave with the best of intentions, other people sometimes perceive us very differently than the way we see ourselves. Feedback from others can help us "hold up a mirror" to see how we are actually behaving. This feedback can be very useful in helping to improve job effectiveness by capitalizing on our strengths and improving weak areas.

The perceptions of how others see you are often the reality of how you behave.

It is important to have feedback from others in order to make adjustments.

Others can help us to see strengths which may be "blind spots" to us.

 

Look for:

  • Strengths/Assets.

  • Weaknesses/Potential liabilities.

  • Areas for change.

  • Message from the overall group.

  • Message from each group.
 

Soliciting Additional Feedback
 

Take the time to carefully review your report. Remember, your feedback report is the first step (not the last) in gaining a better understanding of how others perceive you in your work. Follow-up by talking with those who rated you to obtain more clarity. Here are some suggestions for how best to solicit additional information.

Choose a time and place which encourages discussion. Try to find a relaxed setting and schedule a time when the people you are speaking with are not distracted by other concerns.

Use a group setting (don't single out individuals) when soliciting feedback from coworkers, peers or other groups.

Thank the group for participating.

Give them an overview of the results and ask for help with their interpretation.

Summarize your Areas of Strength and ask for suggestions on how to better utilize these strengths.

"How might I broaden my use of this skill?"
"How can I contribute more to our group's effectiveness?"
"Are there ways I can help others learn?" For areas in which you need to improve or develop, focus on the behaviors and specific actions you can take to be more effective.

 

Do:

  • Ask for support and additional feedback.

  • Use open-ended questions: "What things do I do to cause people to see me this way?"

  • Probe for particulars: "In what situations do I do this?"

  • Listen actively and remain open.

  • Summarize and clarify: "What I'm hearing is that when I do X in the situation, it makes Y happen and what you would like for me to do is Z."

  • Ask for suggestions: "What might I do to be a better (boss, employee, person) for you?"

 

Don't:

  • Defend, justify, or rehash past incidents.

  • Talk when you should be listening.

  • Focus in on results where just one person said something negative.

  • Be accusatory by saying things like "Who Said......."

  • Be satisfied with vague generalities. Ask for specifics so you will know what the behavior looks like.
 

Goal Setting
 

Once you are satisfied that you understand your feedback, identify 3-5 areas to focus on for your Action Plan. These might include goals to better utilize your strengths or goals to improve your work effectiveness.

Don't spread yourself too thin. Commit to a few goals that are important to you and make progress.

 

Building on Strengths

Goal:


Goal:


 

Areas to Improve

Goal:


Goal:


Goal:


 

Action Planning
 

The final, and most important, step in the development process is the design of detailed action plans for achieving your goals.

 

Action plans should be SMART:

S pecific in describing exactly what you will do.
M easurable so that you can observe whether the outcome is achieved.
A ttainable and realistic.
R elevant to improved job effectiveness and job satisfaction.
T argeted so that you will not dilute or scatter your efforts.

Key Elements in the Action Plan are:

  • Your Goal: this may be an area for improvement or a strength on which you want to continue to build.

  • Desired Outcomes: As a result of working this plan, what new outcomes will be achieved? Try to tie these directly to our current job or to a desired future job. Think of at least three observable differences.

  • Action Steps: These will include activities such as the following.

    • Reading a book or article or listening to an audiotape to increase knowledge or learn a skill. - After reading the material write down the main points and find a way to incorporate your learning into your action plan.
    • Watching a video to increase knowledge or learn a skill. - After viewing write down the main points and find a way to incorporate your learning into your action plan.
    • Attending courses and seminars. - After completing the activity write down the main points and find a way to incorporate your learning into your action plan.
    • Finding ways to put the skill into practice on the job.
    • Requesting an assignment or project that requires doing more/less of it.
    • Observing someone doing it well on the job.
    • Seeing a demonstration or asking a role model to show you how.
    • Serving as a role model to others.
    • Teaching others.

  • Involvement of Others: Important people to involve include your boss, mentors, your HR representative, spouse or other trusted confidant.

  • Target Dates: The dates you will begin each action step and the dates you expect to complete them.

  • Progress Indicators: Observable changes that will tell you that you are making progress toward your goal as a result of completing the action step. These might include feedback from others and measurable performance differences.

  • Barriers: Anticipate what things may hinder your ability to complete the action step and develop a strategy to overcome them. Barriers might include time, resources, money, support from others, etc.
 

Implementation
 

The best advice we can give you in implementing your development plan is to BEGIN NOW. Today, after completing your plan, you are motivated; tomorrow, as your work and personal life intrude, you will be distracted. Take action today.

 

  • Schedule a meeting with your boss, coach or mentor to review your plan and refine it based on their good advice.

  • Enroll in the necessary courses and training.

  • Visit the library or local bookstore to obtain books or audiotapes.

  • Make a list of other on-the-job activities you will begin this week.

  • Identify upcoming assignments or projects that you should seek.

  • Seek a coach/mentor if you do not already have one.

 

Remember that you are ultimately responsible for the success of your plan. As you continue your developmental process keep the following in mind.

  • Do not give up. Commit to pursuing your goals and persist in your efforts.

  • Analyze your progress and modify your plan accordingly.

  • Reward yourself when you meet your goals and desired outcomes.

  • Continuous improvement is the key to self-development. Once you have achieved the goals in your current action plan, reassess your situation, seek more feedback, set new goals, and continue on your path of growth and development.
 

Assess360 Action Plan Worksheet
 

 

Developmental Goal:   ____________________________________________
 
Desired Outcomes:



 
Action Step Others to
Involve
Target
Date
Progress
Indicators
Barriers
 
1.        
 
2.        
 
3.        
 
4.        
 
5.        
 
6.        
Copyright 2001 Bigby, Havis & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. (www.bigby.com)
 

Assess360 Action Plan Worksheet
 

 

Developmental Goal:   ____________________________________________
 
Desired Outcomes:



 
Action Step Others to
Involve
Target
Date
Progress
Indicators
Barriers
 
1.        
 
2.        
 
3.        
 
4.        
 
5.        
 
6.        
Copyright 2001 Bigby, Havis & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. (www.bigby.com)
 

Assess360 Action Plan Worksheet
 

 

Developmental Goal:   ____________________________________________
 
Desired Outcomes:



 
Action Step Others to
Involve
Target
Date
Progress
Indicators
Barriers
 
1.        
 
2.        
 
3.        
 
4.        
 
5.        
 
6.        
Copyright 2001 Bigby, Havis & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. (www.bigby.com)
 

Assess360 Action Plan Worksheet
 

 

Developmental Goal:   ____________________________________________
 
Desired Outcomes:



 
Action Step Others to
Involve
Target
Date
Progress
Indicators
Barriers
 
1.        
 
2.        
 
3.        
 
4.        
 
5.        
 
6.        
Copyright 2001 Bigby, Havis & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. (www.bigby.com)
 

Assess360 Action Plan Worksheet
 

 

Developmental Goal:   ____________________________________________
 
Desired Outcomes:



 
Action Step Others to
Involve
Target
Date
Progress
Indicators
Barriers
 
1.        
 
2.        
 
3.        
 
4.        
 
5.        
 
6.        

Copyright 2001 Bigby, Havis & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. (www.bigby.com)
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